1.      General Contours of the Project

An analytic-theological approach of (Christian) theistic doctrines:

a.        Trinitarian theology. This topic includes a variety of the following questions:

-          Faith, experience, natural Reason, and Revelation: Is there any logic in Orthodox dogma?

-          Is the Trinitarian doctrine of Christian theism logically coherent?

-          How could be both three distinct divine persons yet one God;

-          A critical evaluation of various models for solving this logical inconsistency: social theory, unitary view, relative identity theory, liturgical, Trinitarian, collective mind;

-          In what sense God is considered as a person; what is the meaning of divine personhood in Orthodox theology from an analytic perspective? Is it an analogy or metaphor? Is it possible to correlate an apophatic with a kataphatic approach? What about the antinomic theological language (as it was articulated for instance by the eminent Russian 20th c. theologians and thinkers Vl. Lossky, P. Florensky);

b.      Chalcedonian Christology: This topic explores the following questions:

-          Is there any logical consistency of the doctrine?

-          How is it possible for a person to possess predicates that usually attributed only to God?

-          Is it logically consistent to argue for a person as a bearer of both divine and human nature simultaneously? How can one and the same person have ever been fully human and fully divine? 

-          A critical overview and evaluation of different classic (Church Dogmatic Tradition) and modern theories (analytic philosophy-theology) of interpretation.

c.       Anthropology: This topic approaches the following issues:

-          A critical approach of the theory of relative identity in the light of the Orthodox relational theological tradition;

-          The human being in question: Individual Self, Relative identity, physicalism, substance dualism, and property dualism or hypostatic and ecstatic personhood; Are human persons just complicated physical organisms, or mainly essentially souls or a personal wholeness (Maximus the Confessor, Gregory Palamas, etc.)

-          Is the very being of personhood identified with pure relation? The concept of Imago Dei as a mere analogy or metaphor?

d.      The relationship between analytic philosophy and Orthodoxy. Is it legitimate and valuable or a crude blasphemy? A theological and philosophical evaluation

 

2.      Time Plan

Three semesters from September, 2016 to February 2018. We plan to meet regularly in the second or third Saturday between three and seven weeks and in each meeting a key presentation (of 45 minutes) will be read and then a response will be given (of 15-20 minutes) with additional time for discussion and a coffee-break (15-20 minutes): Total duration of each meeting: 2.00-2.30 Hours.

Furthermore we plan to invite two external speakers (one theologian and one philosopher) and to organize one workshop for graduate Students (University of Athens) and young (PhD students, or PostDoc) Scholars interesting in analytic philosophy and theology and a concluding seminar discussing the overall merits from analytic philosophy and theology for the Orthodox Tradition and a meeting evaluating and summarizing the work and the goals achieved by the current research project (with the participation of most of the Cluster Group members as well as scholars interesting in developing analytic philosophy in Greek academia).

September – October 2016: Trinitarian Theology I: Is the Trinitarian doctrine of Christian theism logically coherent? How could be both three distinct divine persons yet one God? A critical evaluation of various models for solving this logical inconsistency: social theory, unitary view, relative identity theory, liturgical, Trinitarian, collective mind.

November - December 2016: Trinitarian Theology II: In what sense God is considered as a person; what is the meaning of divine personhood in Orthodox theology from an analytic perspective? Is it an analogy or metaphor? Is it possible to correlate an apophatic with a kataphatic approach? What about the antinomic theological language (as it was articulated for instance by the eminent Russian 20th c. theologians and thinkers Vl. Lossky, P. Florensky).

January - February 2017: Chalcedonian Christology I. Introduction: Is there any logical consistency of the doctrine? How is it possible for a person to possess predicates that usually attributed only to God?

March - April 2017: Chalcedonian Christology II: Is it logically consistent to argue for a person as a bearer of both divine and human nature simultaneously? How can one and the same person have ever been fully human and fully divine?

May - June 2017: External Speaker I: The relationship between analytic philosophy and Orthodoxy. Is it legitimate and valuable or a crude blasphemy? A theological point of view.

July 2017: A workshop with the participation of graduate Students (University of Athens) and young (PhD students, or PostDoc) Scholars interesting in analytic philosophy and theology.

August 2017: -

September – October 2017: Anthropology I: A critical approach of the theory of relative identity in the light of the orthodox relational tradition? The human being in question: Individual Self, Relative identity, physicalism, substance dualism, and property dualism or hypostatic and ecstatic personhood; Are human persons just complicated physical organisms, or mainly essentially souls or a personal wholeness (Cf. Maximus the Confessor, Gregory Palamas, etc.)

November - December 2017: Anthropology II: Is the very being of personhood identified with pure relation or an object?; The concept of Imago Dei as a mere analogy or metaphor?

January 2018: External Speaker II: The relationship between analytic philosophy and Orthodoxy. Is it legitimate and valuable or a crude blasphemy? A philosophical point of view.

February 2018: A Concluding Seminar discussing the overall merits from analytic philosophy and theology for the Orthodox Tradition and a meeting evaluating and summarizing the work and goals achieved by the research project with the participation of the most of the Cluster Group members as well as scholars interesting in analytic philosophy or philosophy and theology in general.